Planning for Video Marketing Productions Large and Small

In this article, we’re going to talk about all the little videos you should be producing throughout the year, and share some suggestions for getting the job done.

Let’s face it, sometimes big projects are easier to pull off than smaller projects.

If you had a $10,000 budget to shoot a product video, you’d have enough resources to develop the right strategy, find the right vendor, and get the job done.

A budget of that size would allow you to maintain the continued attention of internal stakeholders, and keep you and your team focused on the job at hand.

Give Video Content of All Sizes Its Due

It’s much harder to maintain momentum for producing all the “minor” videos that we all need to produce throughout the year.

When it comes to event promotion videos, partner videos, announcement videos, and any number of other smaller videos, it’s much harder to capture and keep the attention and enthusiasm needed to make consistent progress throughout the year.

Smaller videos like this tend to pop up unexpectedly. They require speedy turnaround, and they rarely command a significant budget.

Consequently, many of them just don’t get done.

Your belief in the advantages of video are no match for the aggravation and distraction of having to put a big project aside in order to produce a quick video in support of a minor happening that has come up at the last minute.

By the time you do everything necessary to produce a winning video (conceive a strategy, develop messaging, produce the video, distribute and promote it through various channels, etc.), it’s likely that your window of opportunity will close. It’s just not worth it.

In these cases, written communications can seem like the only answer to getting something — anything — out the door in support of these promotions of relatively minor consequences.

  • A blog post
  • A news release
  • A website pop up
  • A social media post
Marketing Video Production

All of these are easy to pull off in written form. They’re quick and they’re inexpensive. Unfortunately, they’re not very effective.

Video’s attention-grabbing advantages, and its ability to be easily and quickly consumed, are all abandoned for the sake of expediency.

The remainder of this article will detail how to prepare for video projects of all sizes. Follow these guidelines, and when the opportunity for video arises, your team can spring into action, and not have to fall back to written communications at the expense of results.

Never Miss an Opportunity for Video Again

With the right preparation and foresight, the power of video can be easily brought to bear on even the smallest projects.

Here are some strategies for ensuring that even the smallest promotional opportunities, with the shortest time horizons can be accomplished with video.

Have a Video Production and Marketing Plan

First responders train and train for every possible circumstance, so that they can respond quickly and properly when they encounter the real thing in the field.

Your team needs to be similarly prepared.

Questions to ask when creating a video marketing plan:

  • What will be your video response when a new event needs to be promoted?
  • How will you make the market aware of new developments when they occur?
  • How will you use video to promote all those little things throughout the year that need to be promoted, quickly and properly?
  • Who is responsible for what parts of the video production and distribution strategy?
  • What are the ideal sequence of events when developing a new piece of video content?
  • What levels of effort and skill will be required?
  • And how much will it all cost?

You need to answer these questions before all these smaller opportunities for video promotion arise. Otherwise — and you know this — it’s just not going to get done.

Develop Your Video Infrastructure

Just as you need a response strategy, you’ll need the infrastructure in place to put that strategy into effect.

Imagine that every time you wanted to produce a blog post you had to first figure out how to add a blog to your website. You wouldn’t produce a lot of blog posts.

Similarly, the week before you start promoting your new webinar series is not the time to try to find a good video marketing agency, or even worse, try to figure out which camera you should buy in order to shoot your video yourself.

Figure out what you’re going to need, and build the infrastructure required to develop the video assets you need, in the timeframe you’re likely to need them.

Your infrastructure will obviously depend on your strategy. It might be as easy as having the right vendors prepared to assist you, or as involved as having an in-office studio ready to shoot the needed video assets yourself.

Whatever strategy you settle in, the infrastructure required to implement that strategy must already be in place before video promotion opportunities come along.

Have a Video Marketing Agency on Retainer

Perhaps the easiest way to handle all the video projects you encounter, both small and large, is to have a reliable video marketing agency to support you.

You’ll need to have that agency on retainer to have any assurance at all that they will be available when you need them. (We support multiple customers active in the same niche market. I can tell you that when it comes time for big industry events, the customers who have us on retainer get our attention.)

A good video marketing agency should be able to propose a variety of solutions for meeting your needs.

Work out a service level agreement with the agency to guarantee response times and quality levels.

Do It Yourself

Do-it-yourself video production can be an appropriate option for short, simple videos that require a short turnaround time.

Again, make sure you have the required infrastructure in place to support your DIY strategy. Keep it simple, and make sure you give adequate attention to the full spectrum of tasks required to conceive, shoot, edit, and promote your videos.

Line up the necessary support you need for those parts of the process where you need help. The video production process is easily compartmentalized. Need an editor? You have many choices for outsourcing that phase of the process. Just make sure you can count on the support you need, when you need it.

How to Take Advantage of Video Whenever You’re Given the Opportunity

Video marketing shouldn’t only be for grand projects. The advantages of video can be brought to bear on projects large and small.

Producing video is no harder than producing many other marketing assets. But, like trying to produce blog posts without a blog in place, producing video without the proper strategy, infrastructure, and support, can be a daunting task.

A lack of planning should never be an excuse for giving up on one of the most effective marketing channels at your disposal.

Do your planning, build your infrastructure, and line up the necessary support, so that you will be prepared to produce the video assets, large and small, that you’ll need throughout the year.

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